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Evernote – The first freemium service I paid for (and still do)

If you’re anything like me, you process a ton of information throughout the day. I used to find that a lot of that stuff went in one ear and out the other. I was (and am still) pretty good at remembering the important stuff, and frankly some of the not-so-important stuff too, but there’s just way too much out there to remember all of the details after a quick glance. This is when I turn to Evernote.

Evernote is software that helps me capture notes (text, recorded audio, photos/scans, documents, web pages, etc.) and provides a service that lets me access them from any device using a great text search. It’s easy to capture notes and just as easy to find them later.

Every note sits in a “notebook” which is kind of like a simple folder that the notes sit in. Evernote lets you have as many notebooks as you want.

I started using Evernote as a free app back in the late 2000’s, then in 2010 I made the decision to start paying for their premium version to get a few more features. It’s the first time I was wooed by a freemium service and I have been extremely happy with my investment!

Evernote is the first app I install on my mobile devices

That's my actual home screen. Accept no substitutions.

That’s my actual home screen. Accept no substitutions.

Yup–the very first one. Before anything else. Not only that, but on my Android phone I set up their little widget so I can launch the app, capture a note, capture an image, or record some audio each with only a single click.

It’s a tool that frees me from having to carry a bunch of extra stuff around. I don’t have to save some little scrap of paper that I (or that a friend) scribbled an idea on. I don’t have to tear that ad or article out of a magazine. I don’t have to send an email to myself with that web page or quote I want to reference later. Instead I can send it to Evernote (when I’m on my phone or tablet) or use the desktop app or “web clipper” (when I’m in a browser on my laptop).

Evernote did a good complete reworking of their mobile apps a year or two ago which got rid of a lot of the issues that plague older apps.

The app itself is snappy even on older devices. I have an old phone from a few generations ago that I keep around as a media player and note-taking device which still does just fine running Evernote.

One thing that does cause me occasional issues is that, because I have so many notes in there, space can become an issue. While the app is smart enough to only download the contents of my notes when I need them, the amount of storage space used on the device grows as more and more notes are opened. I’ve dealt with this by clearing the downloaded files, but it’s something I’d like to see be a little more user friendly.

I’m a huge user of Microsoft OneNote, and yes I still use Evernote

It feels important to call this out. I’ve been a OneNote user since Office 2003 (embarrassingly long since it wasn’t that great in 2003). I use OneNote nearly every day and yes I use Evernote just as often. They both work well for different purposes, largely because of the way they are architected.

There are plenty of blog posts out there comparing the two services so I won’t bother with that here. Instead, I want to comment on a couple of the reasons that Evernote continues to be worth the investment even when compared to OneNote which wouldn’t have an incremental cost.

  1. Evernote notes are fantastic containers for all sorts of information. Evernote acts as a simple database for me, but it allows for unstructured data to live inside of these notes, as well as a limited amount of structured metadata like the title, dates, URL (source of a clipping) notebook, and tags.
  2. Evernote provides a more consistent experience across the various platforms (desktop, web, mobile). There’s a trade-off that both Microsoft and Evernote make when it comes to how rich the text/photos and complexity of the way they’re laid out in a note. Microsoft provides a richer experience on the desktop, but those don’t translate as well to a mobile device or to a pure web version. Evernote’s approach, while more limited in the layout features, provides a consistency that I really appreciate.

I got started with the free version, and you can too

I wrote a blog post back in 2010 where I talked about how they had a very compelling offering even with the free version. It wasn’t a crippled version of their product–in fact at the time they included just about every feature, but limited the total upload storage space I could consume each month.

The big feature I wanted when I started subscribing to the premium version was to be able to extend the search to return results inside of attachments like PDF files and pictures. So when I wanted to find a PDF file and the only thing I can remember is that Boba Fett was mentioned in it, I can search for his name and it’ll find the note and the PDF.

Since I became a user, they’ve added a ton of features to the premium offering, but the basic service still lets you create, save, and search notes from the web, a mobile device, or your desktop. When I tell friends/co-workers/random people about Evernote, I usually suggest they just try it out since the free version is so representative of what you get with the paid services.

evernoteversions-2016I grabbed a screenshot of their free vs. paid models. They’ve added a middle tier into the mix as well. The most important reasons I see for the paid versions are:

  • Text search inside of images (plus) and PDFs (premium) — like I said before, it’s a big part of what got me to move
  • Offline notebooks on mobile devices (plus or premium) — There are only a few notebooks I keep offline, but but when I do need it it’s invaluable.
  • Sync with more than 2 devices (plus or premium) — I have too many devices.
  • Remove upload limit of 60MB/mo. (1GB/mo plus, 10GB/mo premium)– This was a thing for me back in 2010 (when the free cap was an at-the-time-generous 40MB). 60MB will probably suit you just fine for text notes and the occasional web page or picture, consider that snapping a quick picture will take up 4MB…yeah that cap is just itching to come off

I could go on and on about how I use it…

…but I don’t want to bury my more detailed stories inside of this post (which feels kind of like unpaid advertising, but I really can’t say enough good things about their service).

In short, I’ve been using the premium subscription for over 6 years and I’m as satisfied now as I was when I started. There aren’t many services I’ve been that happy with–especially when it includes desktop apps, a cloud app, mobile apps, all connected with a cloud-based service. Seriously, when I think of how many freemium services have seemed great and then faded with subsequent releases, I’m really glad they’ve been such a solid team.

Do you use Evernote or perhaps know of something else that’s better? (I question whether the latter is possible…but I am curious) Leave a comment and let me know.

Microsoft Announces: Dynamics CRM Spring 14 update is coming

Just a couple of days ago, while many Dynamics CRM customers getting ready for Microsoft Convergence in Atlanta, Microsoft dropped a press release as well as a Bob Stutz blog post about some forthcoming functionality in the Dynamics CRM Spring release. Microsoft is making good on their more frequent release cadence for Dynamics CRM 2013.

Highlights include:

  • Increased focus on the marketing side of CRM, targeting the CMO (strong message in Bob’s blog post)
  • Marketing enhancements via the Dynamics Marketing product (next step after the Marketing Pilot acquisition last year)
  • Social listening capability native in Dynamics CRM, which will be at no additional cost to CRM Online customers similar to the strategy with InsideView Social Insights functinoality
  • Customer care improvements…separate from the recent Parature acquisition announcement

I’ll be curious to get a pulse on the reaction of folks at Convergence, but at face value this is going to be a great update.

Learning the basics about Microsoft Dynamics CRM

For those of you who are just starting to evaluate CRM options, Michelle Groen of Hitachi Solutions will be holding a free introduction demonstration webinar next week.  It’s scheduled for  February 6th, 2013 from 2-3pm EST and will be covering the following information:

  • Outlook – Converting an email
  • Dashboards – Drill down, Exporting to Excel
  • Marketing – Lead Qualification
  • Sales – Opportunities, Workflows
  • Service – Case Management, KB’s, Dialogs

This is a great way to get a feel for the application and inspiration for what it can do to help transform your business.

If you’re interested, please register (the last one exceeded capacity and only pre-registrants could get in) using:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3143168740836452352

Enjoy!

Full Disclosure: I am employed by Hitachi Solutions.

Entering lists of Option Set values into MS CRM

A co-worker recently shared this project with me as we’ve had some experience with clients who had large number of options that needed to be added to Picklists.

List showing state abbreviations

Fifty US States, maybe some Canadian Provinces

Unfortunately, Dynamics CRM doesn’t offer a way to batch import these lists, rather it’s up to the administrator to add them one-by-one.  Adding in a dozen of these isn’t so bad…especially since you should only have to do it once…but when you start looking at two dozen, fifty, or more of these it becomes a real hassle (and a hotbed for fat-fingered garbage data).  That’s where the CRM Option Set Utility comes into play.

The goals of the project are simple enough:

  1. Provide a resource for the download and maintenance of the CRM 2011 Option Set Import tool which is available for download.
  2. Community resource library of contributed Options Sets that can be used by any Dynamics CRM Organization free of charge.
Application Screenshot

You mean all I need is an Excel spreadsheet with the values in it? Count me in!

After spending some time with the application, specifically testing it using on-premise CRM Organizations, there are a few things that I’ve found worth highlighting:

  • It not only imports the option set, it creates the field from scratch (so you can go straight from an Excel list without having to first create a placeholder in CRM). 
    • Once connected to a CRM Organization, it the UI presents a list of entities you want the Option Set created on.
    • You choose the entities, and whether the option set should be Local to each entity or Global.
    • Note, I had some issues during my testing when I tried to specify a global option set and selected entities at the same time.
      • My workaround for global option sets was to import the option set via the tool, then manually create the attribute on each entity linking it to the global option set.
      • I plan to seek assistance in the forum, but have not been able to get a forum account as of yet.
  • There is good flexibility with respect to setting both the “Label” and “Value” for each item
    • 3 options exist.
      • 1) Start with 1, 2, 3…..
      • 2) Use the defined numbering prefix from a selected Solution in the CRM Organization.
      • 3) Define in Column B of the source spreadsheet.
  • The tool is meant to Create these option sets, not to Update existing option sets.

The bit I like is the community aspect of hosting a repository of common option sets.  There’s about a dozen so far, but as this builds out it will hopefully be a first-stop when looking for a cleansed list like this.

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